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Everything you need to know about drinking from Earthen Pot- Back to Basics

Water consumption is crucial for maintaining good health, particularly in summertime, when temperatures are soaring. This is the time when we crave for a glass of chilled water. We step inside our homes after being under the scorching sun and the first thing we do is drink a glass of chilled water straight from the refrigerator. Drinking cold water gives an instant relief and helps beat the heat.

According to experts, drinking 8-10 glasses of water is necessary to stay hydrated. However, drinking water at a proper temperature is also important. Drinking cold water straight from the refrigerator has been linked with many health issues. Various researchers and even Ayurveda has claimed that refrigerated chilled water weakens our immune system and leads to various health problems.

Here are a few reasons why one should avoid cold water from the refrigerator:

  1. In Ayurveda, it is believed that consuming cold water can weaken your digestive fire, known as Agni, and impacts digestion. Normal body temperature is 37 degree C, and when you consume something very cold, your body compensates by spending energy to regulate this temperature. This energy should originally be used in the process of digestion and absorbing nutrients.
  2. Consuming cold water from the refrigerator can lead to mucus formation. Due to this, problems like sore throat, cold, excess mucus and throat swelling can occur quite frequently. A study conducted in 1978 in a journal CHEST published by American College of Chest Physicians found that nasal mucus thickened after drinking cold refrigerated water and persisted for more than half an hour.
  3. Cold water consumption can also have an effect on the heart rate. It can reduce the heart rate of your body. Research at the National Yang-Ming University School of Medicine in Taiwan found that drinking 250 ml of ice water significantly lowered the heart rate as compared to room temperature water.
  4. It can lead to sudden headaches. Cold water can cool down your nerves in your spine, which affects the brain and nervous system. This situation can increase problems for people who are already suffering from sinus or migraine.

So, what is the solution? For someone like me, I need cold water in summers to quench my thirst. But fret not!! The answer to your concern is- EARTHEN OR CLAY WATER POTS. Drinking water from clay pot or matka, as we call it, is nothing new to us Indians. Our ancestors have been storing water in clay pots for centuries. Earth is natural coolant and also naturally contains many minerals that are healing for human body.

Benefits of Clay Pot water

  • NATURAL COOLER: Clay is porous in nature which helps in cooling the water. Now this naturally cold water unlike refrigerated water will not give you sore throat or cold.  Infact, you’ll be surprised to know that this earthen water is soothing for sore throat because of many minerals that seep into water through clay. 
  • ALKALINE: Clay water is more alkaline than normal water. Clay naturally increases the PH level of water. Alkaline clay reacts with water, in turn increasing its PH level. Hence, we don’t have to run after those expensive water filters which claim to increase PH level of water when we can naturally do it and it is inexpensive. 
  • BOOST DIGESTION: Since clay water is naturally alkaline, it boosts digestion and metabolism. Human body is known to be acidic in nature. Keeping your body alkaline will help you and your child get rid of acidity and indigestion related problems. 
  • PREVENTS SUN-STROKE: Its summer time and temperatures are soaring everywhere. There’s nothing better than drinking water from these earthen pots. This nutrient dense water, will cool your digestive system and will prevent you and your child from other heat related ailments.
  • NATURAL PURIFIER: Clay pots are not just useful to cool the water, but it also helps to purify it naturally. The porous micro-texture blocks contaminants in the water and makes it safe to drink.
  • ENHANCED TASTE AND FRESHNESS: Water stored in earthen pots acquire a distinct taste due to minerals present in clay. This earthiness enhances the taste of the water and makes it refreshing. Also, the porous surface of clay pot allows for air circulation preventing the water from stagnation and helps to maintain its freshness overtime.

How to first time use Clay Pot

When you buy the pot, rinse it well with fresh water 3 to 4 times. Then fill it with water. Keep the water filled pot overnight or for 10 to 12 hours, then empty it. Do this twice. This is called seasoning of clay pots before use. Now, keep the empty pot in the sun for 4 to 5 hours. The sun rays will naturally disinfect the pot. After keeping it in sun, fill it again with water. Empty it after 2 to 3 hours. Now the pot is ready for consumption.

How to clean a Clay Pot

It is recommended to clean the pot at least once a week. To clean all you have to do is keep the empty pot facing upside down in the sun for 4 to 5 hours. The sun will do its job. Afterwards, rinse it with fresh water 2 or 3 times and refill again for consumption. Do not use any dish washing liquids or soap to clean it. Never use a metal scrubber to clean. And never put your hand inside clay pot. This might contaminate it.

Since clay pots are porous in nature, it allows the natural salt and minerals from water to seep through the outside causing a white powdery build up on the outsides of the pot. This residue is not harmful, and it can easily be cleaned with a dry clean cloth.

Some Do’s and Don’ts of Clay Water Pot

  1. Store it in cool, dry place to prevent mold growth.
  2. Don’t store acidic or citrus – based liquids in the clay pot.
  3. Don’t store hot water in it.
  4. Do not keep it in the refrigerator.
  5. Since clay is fragile, handle it with care.

Bottomline

Clay is healing for human body. It is time we go back to our roots. Ancient India extensively used clay wares which is nothing but earth. It is one of the healthiest substances to store water. Water stored in these matkas makes one of the most refreshing drinks on a hot summer day. Introduce your children and family to this goodness. It will help you connect with mother earth and nature.

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147 Kgs to 90 Kgs: 3 Lentils for Fat Loss Win

As you search for information of lentils on google, you run into numerable articles by those media houses and health sites, all by so called professional, maybe marginally better than those AI bots we all use these days. None of those writes of so called big media houses would have actual experience of hacking their own health and understand how food impacts there system beyond what books tell you, or you can search for on internet.

And then comes the world of lentils, which is ever so confusing. Forget of you arte a westerner, chances are even if uou are an Indian born in India, you might not know beyond Kali Dal or Peeli dal. Or maybe sambhar waali daal, and prasade waali daal – thats how we call know our dals. And in my experience any attempt to write a comprehensive blog post about the same, falls flat on the face, as their so much information about each of those lentils that we end up losing the focus or ability to make decision on all the data provided.

In this post I will try to keep things simple and share with you 3 awesome lentils – why they are awesome, and how I am leveraging them in my weight loss journey. And being vegan and all, they I am sure they much lighter on the environment and hopefully some of our consciousness as well.

Getting down to business, here are the 3 Dals or Lentils that are part of my weight loss aresenal, and as the legend goes, traditionally the legends in India have been recommending them for legendary number of years. Different cultures in India appreciate them in different ways and different forms. I remember the saying in our baniya community which has been traditionally vegetarian culture that as people grow old and wise, they stop indulging in lot of things in life and move to one item which becomes stable for them Moong! yup – the legendary moong dal, for those not familiar – hospital wali dal. The Plane Jane dal as plane jane as plane jane it can get, the john doe of dals – the yellow Moong Dal. However here I am talking about the Sabut Moong – which is not your usual hospital waali yellow dal, which is super easy to digest, however I am talking about Whole Moong which is not served in hospitals is it is slow to digest compared to broken or yellow moong dal – which happens to add several steps of processing to the whole or sabut moong I am recommending here.

So yes, the first entry is the Sabut Moong Daal – the Whole Lentil itself – probably in its least processed form, the whole bean/seed itself – complete with all that fiber, all the fat, all the nutrition that nature builds in that bean – the one the legends in India would tell you has ‘Power’ compared to mean and a quick read of the modern nutritional information now verifying that it indeed is loaded with protein, and has a load of fiber as a scoring point over its meaty competitors like chicken, fish or beef.

Its vegan, its whole, its I think cheaper than mean, greener – not only in color, and its so bloofy versatile. Well I will come to that later, but yeah, what I have noticed it that a meal of Sabut Moong with rice or roti or anything – keeps me satiated and full for longer times, which means lesser hunger bangs, longer fasting cycles, and generally a happier and content me. I will soon add a post about how versatile it is in its uses here.

Coming to other two lentils that I want bring to your attention – Dal Makhani – well without the Makhan ofocurse. But you know what if you make it properly and follow classical recipes – making Dal Makhani out of Sabut Urad does not invlove any usage or added butter, cream or fat. If soaked and cooked properly, the lentil itself releases all that is inside it, make it rich and creamy. Yes ladies and gentlemen, the ubiquitous Kaali Dal, the one sold as Dal Makahni at every darned Indian restaurant in the world – when done at home – done right – is the food that would keep you happy and satiated for along time – like moong, this one is also loaded with protein, fiber and natural fats to help you control those GI and GL spikes.

Last but not the least – Moth Dal – I am actually drooling writing this as I am hungry and a Moth dal Chaat would be such a welcome respite in this heat of Delhi. What we call a Chaat – in this case specifically – turns out what a westerner would call a Salal. Yup you are right – sweet chilli tangy sour all in one go, loaded with protein, fiber, is probably sprouted, serves well as chakna, what else should I tell you? Ok ever heard Moth Chawal, Moth Kachori? Yup this one is versatile and with a little innovation – can be used for so many things and in so any ways. Probably another blog post about the same in future.

Phew now that I have written all of the above without AI, let me leverage some of it and at least ask it to generate some pictures so that you can understand how it looks like when you are looking for it. Otherwise if you buy it online I am sure the labels would guide you through.

But remember especially when buying Moon and Urad – you get them in 3 forms – fully processed which looks like Yellow or White – easiest to digest, then you have less processed which is broken, but still has the fiber on top – this would look green or black on outside and maybe lighter yellow inside. And then there is the whole one – which is least processed and not broken. You can choose one as per your needs and uses.

A representation of what Dall-E by OpenAi thinks Urad Dal looks like.
What AI thinks, moth looks like..
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Glycemic Index and Secrets of Weight Loss

blue tape measuring on clear glass square weighing scale

Introduction:

The Glycemic Index (GI) has been a buzzword in the health and nutrition world for years, but what does it truly signify? As more individuals seek effective and sustainable weight loss methods, understanding the role of GI becomes paramount. In this guide, we’ll delve deep into the Glycemic Index, demystify its science, and debunk common myths, providing you with actionable insights for a healthier lifestyle.

Confused between Glycemic Index versus Glycemic Load? Read: Glycemic Index (GI) VS Glycemic Load (GL)


1. What is the Glycemic Index?:

The Glycemic Index is a ranking system that measures how quickly and significantly a carbohydrate-containing food raises blood sugar levels. Foods are ranked on a scale from 0 to 100, with pure glucose (sugar) serving as the reference point with a GI of 100.

  • Low GI (55 or less): Foods that are digested, absorbed, and metabolized slowly, leading to a gradual rise in blood sugar. Examples include whole grains, legumes, and most fruits and vegetables.
  • Medium GI (56-69): Foods that have a moderate impact on blood sugar levels. This category includes some types of rice, raisins, and certain breads.
  • High GI (70 and above): These foods cause a rapid spike in blood sugar. Examples are white bread, most breakfast cereals, and sugary beverages.

Understanding the GI of foods can help individuals make informed dietary choices, especially those looking to manage their blood sugar levels or achieve weight loss.


2. The Science Behind GI and Weight Loss:

The relationship between the Glycemic Index and weight loss is rooted in the body’s insulin response. When we consume high-GI foods, our blood sugar levels rise rapidly, prompting the pancreas to release a surge of insulin. Insulin is a hormone responsible for transporting sugar from the bloodstream into cells. However, excessive insulin can lead to:

  • Fat storage: High insulin levels signal the body to store excess sugar as fat, particularly in the abdominal area.
  • Hunger pangs: A rapid spike in blood sugar followed by a sharp drop can lead to feelings of hunger shortly after eating, increasing the likelihood of overeating.
  • Energy crashes: The post-meal slump many people experience is often due to a rapid drop in blood sugar after consuming high-GI foods.

On the other hand, low-GI foods provide a steady release of energy, keeping hunger at bay and promoting satiety. This not only aids in weight management but also supports stable energy levels throughout the day.


3. Debunking Common Myths about GI:

With the popularity of the Glycemic Index, several myths have emerged. Let’s set the record straight:

  • Myth: “All carbs are bad.”
    • Truth: Not all carbohydrates are created equal. While refined carbs like white bread have a high GI, many whole foods like quinoa, barley, and legumes have a low GI and are packed with essential nutrients.
  • Myth: “A low-GI diet means avoiding all sugars.”
    • Truth: Natural sugars found in fruits, dairy, and some vegetables can be part of a low-GI diet. It’s the added sugars in processed foods that often have a high GI and should be consumed in moderation.
  • Myth: “Low-GI foods are always healthier.”
    • Truth: While many low-GI foods are nutritious, some can be high in unhealthy fats or sodium. It’s essential to consider the overall nutritional profile of a food, not just its GI.

By understanding the facts and dispelling the myths, individuals can make more informed dietary choices that align with their health goals.

However it is also important to understand the Glycemic Loads of the food you are eating as well, to help understand the concept we have made a list as well as calculator here: Glycemic Index (GI) VS Glycemic Load (GL).

4. Benefits of a Low-GI Diet:

Embracing a low-GI diet offers a myriad of health benefits beyond just weight management. Here’s a closer look at some of the advantages:

  • Stable Energy Levels: Low-GI foods provide a steady energy release, helping you avoid those mid-day slumps and maintain consistent energy throughout the day.
  • Reduced Risk of Chronic Diseases: Studies have shown that a low-GI diet can reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and certain types of cancers.
  • Improved Blood Sugar Control: For individuals with diabetes or those at risk, a low-GI diet can help maintain stable blood sugar levels, reducing the need for insulin and other medications.
  • Enhanced Satiety: Foods with a lower GI tend to be richer in fiber and protein, which can help you feel full longer, reducing the likelihood of overeating.
  • Better Digestive Health: Many low-GI foods, such as whole grains and legumes, are high in dietary fiber, promoting healthy digestion and regular bowel movements.

5. Practical Tips to Incorporate Low-GI Foods:

Transitioning to a low-GI diet doesn’t have to be challenging. Here are some practical tips to help you make the shift:

  • Start with Whole Grains: Replace white rice and bread with whole grain alternatives like brown rice, quinoa, and whole grain bread.
  • Snack Smart: Opt for low-GI snacks like nuts, seeds, and Greek yogurt instead of chips or sugary treats.
  • Incorporate Legumes: Beans, lentils, and chickpeas are not only low in GI but also packed with protein and fiber. Add them to salads, soups, or stews.
  • Limit Sugary Beverages: Instead of sodas or sugary juices, hydrate with water, herbal teas, or unsweetened beverages.
  • Read Labels: When shopping, check the labels for added sugars and high-GI ingredients. The fewer the ingredients, the better.
  • Cook at Home: Preparing meals at home allows you to control the ingredients and ensure you’re consuming low-GI foods.

7. FAQs about Glycemic Index and Weight Loss:

As the Glycemic Index gains traction in health and nutrition circles, several questions arise. Here are answers to some frequently asked questions:

  • Q: Can I eat high-GI foods in moderation?
    • A: Yes, it’s about balance. While the focus should be on low-GI foods, occasional indulgence in high-GI foods is okay, especially if combined with low-GI foods to balance the impact on blood sugar.
  • Q: Is the Glycemic Index the only factor to consider for weight loss?
    • A: No, while GI is a valuable tool, other factors like calorie intake, portion sizes, and overall diet quality also play crucial roles in weight management.
  • Q: How does protein and fat affect the GI of foods?
    • A: Protein and fat can lower the GI of a meal. For instance, adding avocado or nuts to a dish can reduce its overall GI.
  • Q: Are all fruits high in GI?
    • A: No, many fruits like berries, apples, and pears have a low to medium GI. However, tropical fruits like pineapples and mangoes tend to have a higher GI.

Conclusion and Takeaways:

The Glycemic Index offers a unique lens through which we can understand our food choices and their impact on our blood sugar and overall health. By incorporating low-GI foods, debunking myths, and adopting a holistic approach to well-being, individuals can pave the way for sustainable weight loss and optimal health. Remember, it’s not just about numbers but making informed and balanced choices that align with your health goals and lifestyle.

FAQs

  1. What exactly is the Glycemic Index (GI)?
  • The Glycemic Index is a ranking system that measures how quickly and significantly a carbohydrate-containing food raises blood sugar levels. Foods are ranked on a scale from 0 to 100, with pure glucose serving as the reference point with a GI of 100.
  1. How does the Glycemic Index impact weight loss?
  • Foods with a high GI can cause rapid spikes in blood sugar, leading to increased insulin production, which can promote fat storage. On the other hand, low-GI foods provide a steady energy release, helping to control appetite and support sustainable weight loss.
  1. Are all carbs bad when considering the Glycemic Index?
  • Not all carbohydrates are created equal. While refined carbs like white bread have a high GI, many whole foods like quinoa, barley, and legumes have a low GI and are packed with essential nutrients.
  1. How can I start incorporating low-GI foods into my diet?
  • Begin by choosing whole grains over refined grains, opt for fresh fruits and vegetables, and include legumes and lean proteins in your meals. Reading food labels and being aware of added sugars can also guide healthier choices.
  1. Is a low-GI diet suitable for everyone?
  • While many people can benefit from a low-GI diet, especially those looking to manage blood sugar or lose weight, individual needs may vary. It’s always best to consult with a nutritionist or healthcare provider to tailor a diet to your specific requirements.
  1. How does a low-GI diet compare to other popular diets like Keto or Paleo?
  • While the low-GI diet focuses on the blood sugar impact of foods, diets like Keto emphasize low carbohydrate intake, and Paleo prioritizes whole, unprocessed foods. Each diet has its merits, and the best choice often depends on individual health goals and preferences.
  1. Can I eat fruits on a low-GI diet?
  • Absolutely! Many fruits, such as berries, apples, and pears, have a low to medium GI. However, it’s essential to be mindful of portion sizes and opt for whole fruits over fruit juices or dried fruits.

Blog Tags for the Post:
Glycemic Index, Weight Loss, Low-GI Diet, Blood Sugar Management, Healthy Eating, Carbohydrates, Nutrition Tips, Whole Grains, Insulin Response, Sustainable Weight Loss, Dietary Choices, Low-GI Foods.

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Glycemic Index (GI) VS Glycemic Load (GL)

GI vs. GL: Understanding the Impact on Your Blood Sugar

When it comes to understanding how foods affect your blood sugar, two terms often come into play: the Glycemic Index (GI) and the Glycemic Load (GL). While they might sound similar, they have distinct differences that can influence your dietary choices, especially if you’re managing diabetes, aiming for weight loss, or just trying to maintain a healthy lifestyle.

Glycemic Index (GI): The Speedometer of Sugar Absorption

Think of GI as a speedometer that measures how fast a carbohydrate-containing food causes an increase in blood sugar levels. Foods are rated on a scale of 0 to 100, with pure glucose arbitrarily assigned a value of 100. This rating indicates the relative speed at which the body breaks down the carbs in a food into glucose.

  • High GI Foods (70 and above): These foods break down quickly during digestion, leading to a rapid increase in blood sugar. Think white bread, pretzels, and short-grain rice.
  • Medium GI Foods (56-69): These foods have a moderate effect on blood sugar. Examples include quick oats and brown rice.
  • Low GI Foods (55 and below): These foods break down slowly, releasing glucose gradually into the bloodstream, like lentils, most fruits, and non-starchy vegetables.

Understand more about Glycemic Index and Secrets of Weight Loss.

Glycemic Load (GL): The Bigger Picture of Blood Sugar Management

If GI is the speedometer, then GL is the complete dashboard that shows not just the speed, but also the volume of fuel being used. GL takes into account the GI of a food as well as the amount of carbohydrates in a typical serving size.

To calculate GL, you use the following formula:

GL=(GI×the amount of carbohydrate in one serving)÷100

  • Low GL (1-10): Foods in this category have a minimal impact on blood sugar levels. Incorporating more low-GL foods into your diet can help maintain stable energy levels throughout the day, making them ideal for weight management and overall health. Examples include most non-starchy vegetables, some fruits like cherries and grapefruit, and legumes.
  • Medium GL (11-19): These foods have a moderate effect on blood sugar levels. They can be included in a balanced diet but should be paired with low-GL foods or healthy fats and proteins to mitigate blood sugar spikes. Examples include whole wheat products, sweet potatoes, and some fruits like bananas and pineapple.
  • High GL (20+): High-GL foods cause significant spikes in blood sugar levels. They should be consumed sparingly, especially for individuals managing diabetes, prediabetes, or looking to stabilize their energy levels. Examples include white bread, short-grain rice, and baked goods made with refined flour.

Glycemic Load Calculator

The Glycemic Load Calculator is a handy tool designed to help you determine the glycemic load (GL) of various food items based on their glycemic index (GI) and portion size. It is especially useful for individuals managing their blood sugar levels or following a low glycemic diet. This tool would help you understand the total GL of your individual food items as well as what happens when you combine them in certain quantities.

How it Works:

  1. Search for Food Items: Start by typing the name of the food item you want to include in your calculation into the search box. The tool will display a list of matching food items with their GI and GL values.
  2. Select Food Items: Click on the desired food item from the search results to add it to your selection. You can add multiple items to your list. For eg. for a salad with Nuts, Apples, and Honey – you will choose all three.
  3. Enter Portion Size: After selecting a food items, you’ll be prompted to enter the portion size in grams. This step allows for a more accurate calculation of the glycemic load based on your intended serving size. I
  4. View Total Glycemic Load: As you add food items and specify their portion sizes, the tool dynamically calculates and displays the total glycemic load of your selection. This value reflects the combined effect of all selected food items on blood sugar levels.
  5. Clear Selection: If needed, you can easily clear your selection and start over by clicking the “Clear All” button.

Once you have the value, you can see what category your meal is expected to fall into – Low, High, or Medium.

Glycemic Load Calculator

Glycemic Load Calculator

Calculate the glycemic load of your food items based on their glycemic index (GI) and portion size.

Selected Items

Total GL: 0

The total glycemic load (GL) is a measure of how much carbohydrate a food will provide.

Note: If you are not able to find the food item you are looking for inb this calculator, leave a comment below and we will make efforts to add them as soon as we can. Also this is just a tool for you to understand, we advice you to rely on serious and professional medical advice before you make any changes or alter your diet.

Benefits:

  • Accuracy: Provides a more accurate assessment of the glycemic load by accounting for both the GI and portion size of each food item.
  • Convenience: Accessible online tool that streamlines the process of glycemic load calculation, saving time and effort.
  • Educational: Helps users understand the impact of different foods on blood sugar levels and supports informed dietary choices.

Whether you’re managing diabetes, seeking to balance your energy levels, or simply curious about the glycemic impact of your meals, the Glycemic Load Calculator is a valuable resource for optimizing your diet and overall health.

Demystifying Glycemic Load: Practical Examples and Implications

To truly understand the practical applications of Glycemic Load (GL), let’s roll up our sleeves and dive into some real-life food examples. By breaking down the calculation, we can see the real-world implications of this measurement for our daily food choices.

The Formula in Action

Recall the formula for GL:
GL=(GI×the amount of carbohydrate in one serving (in grams))÷100

Example 1: Watermelon

Watermelon has a high GI of 72, which may initially cause alarm. But let’s calculate its GL:

  • Carbohydrates per serving (120g of watermelon): 6 grams
  • GI: 72

Using our formula:
GL=(72×6)÷100=4.32

So, a standard serving of watermelon has a GL of 4.32, which is low. This means that despite its high GI, watermelon doesn’t raise your blood sugar significantly when eaten in typical servings.

Implications:

You can enjoy watermelon without worrying about a major spike in blood sugar levels. It’s refreshing, hydrating, and diabetes-friendly in moderation.

Example 2: Brown Rice

Brown rice has a moderate GI of 50. Let’s calculate its GL:

  • Carbohydrates per serving (1 cup cooked, approximately 150g): 45 grams
  • GI: 50

GL=(50×45)÷100=22.5

A cup of brown rice has a GL of 22.5, which is high.

Implications:

Even though brown rice is often touted as a healthy whole grain with a moderate GI, its GL tells us that it can still have a significant impact on blood sugar levels, especially in typical portions eaten.

Example 3: Carrots

Carrots have a medium GI of 47, but let’s look at the GL:

  • Carbohydrates per serving (one medium carrot, approximately 61g): 6 grams
  • GI: 47

GL=(47×6)÷100=2.82

A medium carrot has a GL of 2.82, which is low.

Implications:

Carrots can be eaten without much worry about blood sugar spikes, making them a great snack for those on a blood sugar-conscious diet.

Making Informed Choices with GL

What these examples show us is that the Glycemic Load gives us a more nuanced view of how our body might react to different foods. A food with a high GI might not necessarily have a high GL if the amount of carbohydrates per serving is low. Conversely, a food with a medium GI could have a high GL if eaten in large portions.

The Takeaway

When planning meals and making dietary choices, especially for individuals managing diabetes or insulin resistance, considering the GL offers a more accurate gauge of how the food may influence blood sugar levels. This empowers you to choose foods that keep your blood sugar levels more stable throughout the day, which is crucial for long-term health and energy management. Remember, it’s not just about the type of carbohydrate, but also the quantity that counts.

Why Both GI and GL Matter

Understanding both GI and GL can provide a more complete strategy for blood sugar management:

  • GI for Speed: GI is a useful measure when you need to know how quickly a food might spike your blood sugar. This can be particularly important for diabetics who need to match their insulin timing with meals.
  • GL for Volume: GL helps you understand how much a serving of food is likely to affect your blood sugar levels. This can be more useful for meal planning since it considers portion size.

Harmonizing GI and GL in Your Diet

To keep your blood sugar in check, consider both the GI and the GL of foods:

  • Choose low to medium GI foods: These are generally better for blood sugar control.
  • Pay attention to portion sizes: Even low-GI foods can lead to blood sugar spikes if consumed in large quantities.
  • Balance your meals: Combine higher GI foods with proteins, fats, and fiber to slow down the absorption of glucose.

By using the GI and GL in tandem, you can make informed decisions that go beyond just “good” or “bad” carbs, tailoring your diet to fit your health needs with precision and care. Whether you’re filling your plate with low-GI vegetables or treating yourself to a moderate-GL fruit, you’ll be doing so with the insight needed to maintain a stable and healthy blood sugar level.

Here is a list of some common foods and their GI and GL values that we generated or found via AI for quick and easy reference. For actual inpact you might want to do a CGM or other test on your own body to see how it behaves for a particular food item.

Fruits:

  1. Apple, GI: 36, GL: 2 – A crunchy delight packed with fiber, aiding digestion and heart health.
  2. Banana, GI: 51, GL: 12 – Energizing and potassium-rich, perfect for active lifestyles.
  3. Strawberries, GI: 41, GL: 3 – Sweet and nutrient-packed, promoting skin health and immunity.
  4. Oranges, GI: 43, GL: 3 – Citrus gems high in vitamin C, boosting immune defense.
  5. Peach, GI: 42, GL: 5 – Juicy and refreshing, with vitamins A and C for overall wellness.
  6. Mango, GI: 51, GL: 7 – Tropical sweetness brimming with vitamins for digestive health.
  7. Watermelon, GI: 76, GL: 4 – Hydrating and refreshing, with a high GI but low carb content.
  8. Grapes, GI: 49, GL: 8 – A cluster of antioxidants, supporting heart health and hydration.
  9. Blueberries, GI: 53, GL: 5 – Antioxidant powerhouses, enhancing cognitive function.
  10. Raspberries, GI: 32, GL: 3 – Fiber-rich, aiding in weight management and digestion.
  11. Kiwi, GI: 50, GL: 7 – A vitamin C powerhouse, with enzymes that aid digestion.
  12. Pineapple, GI: 59, GL: 6 – Sweet and tangy, rich in digestion-improving bromelain.
  13. Cherries, GI: 22, GL: 9 – Low GI, packed with antioxidants, aiding sleep and recovery.
  14. Papaya, GI: 59, GL: 10 – Enzyme-rich for digestive health, with a tropical flavor.
  15. Plum, GI: 40, GL: 2 – Sweet with a hint of tartness, offering dietary fiber and vitamins.
  16. Pomegranate, GI: 18, GL: 4 – Nutrient-dense, with powerful anti-inflammatory properties.
  17. Apricot, GI: 34, GL: 3 – A fiber-rich fruit, perfect for blood sugar control.
  18. Grapefruit, GI: 25, GL: 3 – Low GI, aiding weight loss and promoting heart health.
  19. Pear, GI: 38, GL: 4 – Soft and juicy, with a high fiber content for digestion.
  20. Blackberries, GI: 25, GL: 4 – High in vitamins C and K, fiber, and antioxidant-rich.
  21. Cantaloupe, GI: 65, GL: 4 – Sweet and hydrating, with vitamins A and C for skin and vision.
  22. Fig, GI: 61, GL: 16 – Unique in flavor, high in fiber, and rich in minerals.
  23. Nectarine, GI: 43, GL: 4 – Smooth-skinned and succulent, with a good vitamin mix.
  24. Tangerine, GI: 42, GL: 3 – A burst of citrus goodness, promoting healthy skin and vision.
  25. Lemon, GI: 20, GL: 1 – High in vitamin C, perfect for detoxification and boosting immunity.

Vegetables:

  1. Carrots, GI: 39, GL: 2 – Crunchy and rich in beta-carotene, supporting eye health.
  2. Broccoli, GI: 10, GL: 1 – Packed with vitamins C and K, and fiber for digestive health.
  3. Spinach, GI: 15, GL: 1 – Iron-rich for energy, with ample vitamins for overall vitality.
  4. Kale, GI: 15, GL: 1 – A nutrient powerhouse, offering detoxification benefits.
  5. Zucchini, GI: 15, GL: 1 – Low in carbs, versatile in recipes, promoting heart health.
  6. Cauliflower, GI: 10, GL: 1 – Offers a low-carb alternative to grains and supports hormonal balance.
  7. Asparagus, GI: 15, GL: 1 – Aids in digestion and is beneficial for a healthy pregnancy.
  8. Bell Peppers, GI: 40, GL: 2 – Vibrant and vitamin-rich, enhancing immune function.
  9. Garlic, GI: 30, GL: 1 – Flavorful with heart health and blood pressure benefits.
  10. Onion, GI: 10, GL: 2 – Adds depth to dishes; supports bone and heart health.
  11. Tomato, GI: 15, GL: 1 – Lycopene-rich for heart health and reduced cancer risk.
  12. Eggplant, GI: 15, GL: 1 – Fiber-rich, versatile in cooking, supports brain health.
  13. Cucumber, GI: 15, GL: 1 – Hydrating and refreshing, perfect for skin health.
  14. Lettuce, GI: 15, GL: 1 – A hydrating base for salads, rich in vitamins A and K.
  15. Sweet Potato, GI: 54, GL: 10 – High in beta-carotene, offering sustained energy.
  16. Mushroom, GI: 15, GL: 1 – Low in calories, great for immune support and satiety.
  17. Green Beans, GI: 15, GL: 3 – Crunchy and full of fiber, supporting heart health.
  18. Brussels Sprouts, GI: 15, GL: 2 – Offers cancer-fighting antioxidants and is high in fiber.
  19. Pumpkin, GI: 75, GL: 3 – Fiber-rich and versatile, with a sweet, earthy flavor.
  20. Radish, GI: 15, GL: 1 – Peppery and crisp, aids in digestion and detoxification.
  21. Celery, GI: 15, GL: 1 – Low in calories but rich in hydration and vitamins.
  22. Beetroot, GI: 61, GL: 5 – Earthy and sweet, boosts stamina and supports brain health.
  23. Squash, GI: 15, GL: 2 – Rich in vitamins A and C, with a sweet, nutty flavor.
  24. Cabbage, GI: 10, GL: 1 – Detoxifying, with cholesterol-lowering benefits.
  25. Artichoke, GI: 15, GL: 3 – High in fiber and nutrients, supports liver health and digestion.

Seeds

  1. Chia Seeds, GI: 1, GL: 1 – Omega-3 rich, boosting heart health and hydration.
  2. Flaxseeds, GI: 0, GL: 0 – Loaded with fiber and omega-3s, supporting digestion and hormonal balance.
  3. Pumpkin Seeds, GI: 10, GL: 1 – A magnesium powerhouse, enhancing sleep and heart health.
  4. Sunflower Seeds, GI: 20, GL: 2 – High in vitamin E, promoting skin health and immune function.
  5. Sesame Seeds, GI: 35, GL: 3 – Rich in calcium, beneficial for bone health.
  6. Hemp Seeds, GI: 0, GL: 0 – Complete protein source, rich in healthy fats.
  7. Quinoa, GI: 53, GL: 13 – A seed that’s a complete protein with all essential amino acids.

Nuts

  1. Almonds, GI: 0, GL: 0 – Supports heart health with healthy fats and vitamin E.
  2. Walnuts, GI: 0, GL: 0 – Omega-3 fatty acids for brain health and reducing inflammation.
  3. Cashews, GI: 22, GL: 9 – Good for bone health with iron and magnesium.
  4. Pecans, GI: 0, GL: 0 – Antioxidants for anti-aging and reducing disease risk.
  5. Hazelnuts, GI: 0, GL: 0 – Loaded with vitamins and healthy fats for heart health.
  6. Peanuts, GI: 7, GL: 1 – High in biotin and healthy fats, despite being a legume.
  7. Brazil Nuts, GI: 0, GL: 0 – High selenium content for thyroid health.
  8. Pistachios, GI: 15, GL: 4 – Good for heart health, lower in calories.
  9. Macadamia Nuts, GI: 0, GL: 0 – Rich in monounsaturated fats for improved heart health.
  10. Pine Nuts, GI: 15, GL: 2 – Contains pinolenic acid which may help suppress hunger.

Dried Fruits

  1. Raisins, GI: 64, GL: 28 – Iron-rich, aiding in digestion and energy.
  2. Dried Apricots, GI: 32, GL: 9 – High in fiber, promoting eye health.
  3. Dates, GI: 42, GL: 18 – Nutrient-dense, great for energy and brain health.
  4. Dried Figs, GI: 61, GL: 16 – High in fiber, beneficial for digestive health.
  5. Prunes, GI: 29, GL: 10 – Known for digestive benefits and antioxidant content.
  6. Dried Coconut, GI: 42, GL: 9 – Provides medium-chain triglycerides for energy and brain function.
  7. Dried Cranberries, GI: 65, GL: 24 – Often sweetened; high in antioxidants for urinary tract health.
  8. Goji Berries, GI: 29, GL: 13 – Packed with antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals for eye health and immune support.

Millets

  1. Pearl Millet (Bajra), GI: 54, GL: 12 – Rich in protein and fiber, aids in controlling diabetes.
  2. Finger Millet (Ragi), GI: 104, GL: 25 – High calcium content, excellent for bone health.
  3. Foxtail Millet, GI: 50, GL: 15 – Gluten-free, with a high mineral content, supports immunity.
  4. Sorghum (Jowar), GI: 62, GL: 10 – Antioxidant-rich, cholesterol-lowering effects.
  5. Barnyard Millet, GI: 41, GL: 10 – High fiber content, beneficial for weight management.
  6. Proso Millet, GI: 70, GL: 12 – Provides essential amino acids and is easy to digest.
  7. Little Millet, GI: 55, GL: 17 – Rich in B-vitamins, potassium, and iron, supports metabolism.
  8. Kodo Millet, GI: 59, GL: 20 – Good source of magnesium, helps in diabetes management.
  9. Teff, GI: 74, GL: 22 – High in protein and calcium, suitable for gluten-free diets.
  10. Amaranth, GI: 97, GL: 21 – Loaded with proteins and lysine, improves heart health.

Grains & Rice

  1. Brown Rice, GI: 50, GL: 16 – Whole grain, rich in antioxidants and aids in weight loss.
  2. White Rice, GI: 72, GL: 29 – Quick energy source, less nutritional than brown rice.
  3. Basmati Rice, GI: 58, GL: 22 – Aromatic, with a lower GI, suitable for moderate consumption.
  4. Jasmine Rice, GI: 89, GL: 45 – Known for its fragrant aroma, higher GI.
  5. Wild Rice, GI: 57, GL: 12 – Rich in antioxidants, protein, and dietary fiber.
  6. Black Rice, GI: 42, GL: 12 – High in anthocyanins, supports heart and liver health.
  7. Red Rice, GI: 55, GL: 21 – Contains antioxidants and can help reduce inflammation.
  8. Quinoa, GI: 53, GL: 13 – A complete protein with a low GI, good for blood sugar control.
  9. Barley, GI: 28, GL: 12 – Lowers blood sugar and cholesterol, high in beta-glucan.
  10. Oats, GI: 55, GL: 4 – Offers soluble fiber, beneficial for heart health and digestion.
  11. Buckwheat, GI: 49, GL: 13 – Gluten-free, good for cardiovascular health.
  12. Bulgur Wheat, GI: 48, GL: 12 – Quick cooking, high in fiber and protein.
  13. Spelt, GI: 54, GL: 15 – High in protein and minerals, with a nutty flavor.
  14. Freekeh, GI: 43, GL: 15 – High in fiber and protein, aids in digestion and satiety.

Wheat & Wheat Products

  1. Whole Wheat Bread, GI: 69, GL: 9 – Rich in fiber, supports digestive health and satiety.
  2. Whole Wheat Pasta, GI: 42, GL: 16 – A healthier pasta option, maintaining energy levels without spiking blood sugar.
  3. Durum Wheat Semolina, GI: 66, GL: 14 – Used in pasta and couscous, a moderate GI option for balanced diets.
  4. Bulgur Wheat, GI: 48, GL: 12 – Quick-cooking, nutrient-dense, ideal for salads and sides.
  5. Spelt Flour, GI: 54, GL: 11 – Offers a nutty flavor, with higher protein and fiber than common wheat.
  6. Whole Grain Wheat Flour, GI: 45, GL: 9 – Retains nutrients and fiber, better for blood sugar control.
  7. Farro, GI: 40, GL: 10 – An ancient grain with a chewy texture, rich in fiber, protein, and nutrients.
  8. Seitan (Wheat Gluten), GI: 75, GL: 14 – A high-protein, vegan meat substitute made from wheat gluten.
  9. Wheat Berries, GI: 41, GL: 12 – Whole wheat kernels, excellent source of fiber and nutrients.
  10. Wheat Bran, GI: 42, GL: 0 – High in dietary fiber, aids in digestive health.

Lentils & Legumes

  1. Green Lentils, GI: 30, GL: 5 – High in protein and fiber, supporting heart and digestive health.
  2. Red Lentils, GI: 26, GL: 4 – Cook quickly, offering protein and essential nutrients for energy.
  3. Chickpeas (Garbanzo Beans), GI: 28, GL: 8 – Versatile in dishes, packed with protein, fiber, and iron.
  4. Black Beans, GI: 30, GL: 7 – Rich in antioxidants, fiber, and protein, aiding in blood sugar control.
  5. Kidney Beans, GI: 24, GL: 7 – Great source of plant-based protein, improves heart health.
  6. Navy Beans, GI: 31, GL: 9 – High in fiber, supports weight management and reduces cholesterol.
  7. Pinto Beans, GI: 39, GL: 10 – Offers a good balance of protein and fiber, versatile in recipes.
  8. Soybeans, GI: 16, GL: 1 – Rich in protein, omega-3 fatty acids, and antioxidants.
  9. Edamame, GI: 18, GL: 4 – Young soybeans, offering a sweet, slightly grassy taste, high in protein.
  10. Lima Beans, GI: 32, GL: 6 – Provides a buttery texture, high in fiber and manganese for energy.
  11. Mung Beans, GI: 25, GL: 4 – Light and digestible, good for detox diets, rich in vitamins.
  12. Black-eyed Peas, GI: 33, GL: 10 – Good source of protein, potassium, and fiber, supports eye health.
  13. Lentil Pasta, GI: 34, GL: 15 – A gluten-free, high-protein pasta alternative, maintaining muscle health.
  14. Peas, GI: 48, GL: 3 – Sweet and starchy, high in vitamins, fiber, and antioxidants.

Dairy and Alternatives

  1. Skim Milk, GI: 37, GL: 4 – Low-fat, high-calcium drink for bone health.
  2. Greek Yogurt (plain), GI: 11, GL: 3 – Rich in protein, supports digestive health.
  3. Almond Milk (unsweetened), GI: 25, GL: 0 – A dairy-free alternative, low in calories.
  4. Soy Milk, GI: 34, GL: 3 – Plant-based, high in protein and vitamins.
  5. Cheddar Cheese, GI: 0, GL: 0 – High in calcium and protein, for bone and muscle health.
  6. Cottage Cheese, GI: 30, GL: 3 – Low-fat, high-protein option for weight management.
  7. Oat Milk, GI: 30, GL: 4 – A creamy, fiber-rich dairy alternative.
  8. Coconut Yogurt, GI: 60, GL: 6 – Dairy-free, probiotic-rich for gut health.
  9. Butter, GI: 0, GL: 0 – Source of saturated fats, used sparingly in diets.
  10. Cashew Cheese, GI: 30, GL: 2 – Vegan, rich in healthy fats and nutrients.

Meats and Alternatives

  1. Chicken Breast, GI: 0, GL: 0 – Lean protein, versatile in healthy diets.
  2. Tofu, GI: 15, GL: 1 – Plant-based protein, ideal for vegetarian meals.
  3. Salmon, GI: 0, GL: 0 – Rich in omega-3 fatty acids, supports heart health.
  4. Lean Beef, GI: 0, GL: 0 – High in protein and iron, for energy and muscle health.
  5. Tempeh, GI: 15, GL: 2 – Fermented soy product, high in protein and fiber.
  6. Eggs, GI: 0, GL: 0 – Excellent source of protein and vitamins.
  7. Lentil Patty, GI: 30, GL: 10 – Vegetarian burger alternative, high in fiber.
  8. Turkey, GI: 0, GL: 0 – Low-fat meat, good for heart health.
  9. Black Bean Burger, GI: 30, GL: 7 – Vegan, rich in protein and fiber.
  10. Seitan, GI: 75, GL: 14 – Wheat-based meat substitute, high in protein.

Fats and Oils

  1. Olive Oil, GI: 0, GL: 0 – Rich in monounsaturated fats, promotes heart health.
  2. Avocado Oil, GI: 0, GL: 0 – High in oleic acid, beneficial for cholesterol.
  3. Coconut Oil, GI: 0, GL: 0 – Medium-chain triglycerides for energy and brain function.
  4. Flaxseed Oil, GI: 0, GL: 0 – High in omega-3 fatty acids, anti-inflammatory.
  5. Butter, GI: 0, GL: 0 – Saturated fats, used in moderation for flavor.
  6. Canola Oil, GI: 0, GL: 0 – Low in saturated fat, high in omega-3s.
  7. Walnut Oil, GI: 0, GL: 0 – Polyunsaturated fats, good for heart health.
  8. Ghee (Clarified Butter), GI: 0, GL: 0 – Lactose-free, rich in fat-soluble vitamins.
  9. Sesame Oil, GI: 0, GL: 0 – Adds flavor, contains antioxidants.
  10. Almond Butter, GI: 0, GL: 0 – A spread high in healthy fats and vitamins.

Sugars and Sweeteners

  1. Stevia, GI: 0, GL: 0 – A natural sweetener with no calories, suitable for diabetes.
  2. Honey, GI: 55, GL: 10 – Natural sweetener, antioxidants, used sparingly.
  3. Maple Syrup, GI: 54, GL: 9 – Contains minerals and antioxidants, but high in sugar.
  4. Agave Nectar, GI: 15, GL: 11 – Low GI, but high in fructose, use in moderation.
  5. Cane Sugar, GI: 65, GL: 65 – High GI, used sparingly in a balanced diet.
  6. Xylitol, GI: 13, GL: 7 – Sugar alcohol, tooth-friendly, low calorie.
  7. Coconut Sugar, GI: 35, GL: 10 – A more nutritious alternative to refined sugar.
  8. Erythritol, GI: 1, GL: 0 – Nearly calorie-free, doesn’t spike blood sugar.
  9. Sucralose (Splenda), GI: 0, GL: 0 – Artificial sweetener, no calories, suitable for baking.
  10. Monk Fruit Sweetener, GI: 0, GL: 0 – Natural, no-calorie sweetener, diabetic-friendly.

10 FAQs for Understanding GI and GL in Your Diet

1. How can knowing about GI and GL enhance my diet? Understanding GI and GL can help you make better dietary choices by showing how different foods affect your blood sugar levels. This knowledge is invaluable for managing energy levels, weight, and conditions like diabetes.

2. What’s a simple way to start using GI and GL in my daily meals? Begin by incorporating more low-GI foods into your meals. Pay attention to portion sizes to manage GL and balance your plate with healthy fats and proteins to stabilize blood sugar.

3. Can high-GI foods ever be part of a healthy diet? Yes, in moderation. High-GI foods can be included in a healthy diet, especially when paired with foods high in fiber, protein, or healthy fats to mitigate blood sugar spikes.

4. How do I calculate the GL of my favorite foods? To calculate GL, multiply the GI of the food by the number of carbohydrates in a serving, then divide by 100. Nutritional labels and GI databases can provide the necessary figures.

5. Are low-GI foods always healthier than high-GI foods? Not necessarily. Low-GI foods are generally healthier as they cause a slower rise in blood sugar. However, other factors like nutrient density and caloric content should also be considered for overall health.

6. Do I need to avoid all high-GI foods if I have diabetes? Not all high-GI foods need to be avoided, but it’s essential to balance them within your diet and monitor your blood sugar levels in consultation with your healthcare provider.

7. Is GI relevant if I’m on a low-carb diet? GI may be less relevant on a low-carb diet since you’re likely consuming fewer carbs overall, but it can still be a useful tool for the carbs you do eat.

8. Can the cooking method alter the GI of foods? Yes, cooking methods can affect GI. For example, al dente pasta has a lower GI than softer-cooked pasta. Similarly, the ripeness of fruits can affect their GI.

9. How can I maintain a low-GI and GL diet when eating out? When dining out, opt for dishes with lean proteins, vegetables, and whole grains, and be mindful of portion sizes to keep your GL in check.

10. Where can I find a reliable GI and GL food database? There are various databases and apps available online that provide GI and GL values. The American Diabetes Association and Glycemic Index Foundation are good places to start.

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glycemic index, glycemic load, blood sugar management, healthy eating, diabetes diet, low-GI foods, low-GL foods, nutritional guide, carbohydrate counting, portion control

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Treadmill vs. Running Outside

man wearing black tank top and running on seashore

Treadmills and Strokes! Offlate we have been hearing a bit about the phenomena, of otherwise healthy people suffering some kind of stroke – while working out and that too mostly on treadmill.

As someone who has been leveraging walking and movement myself, I cannot help but stop think about the phenomenon and if you are regular as gym or use treadmill, this should be useful for you.

Imagine – You’re out for a run, walk or jog – feeling the burn, and suddenly your body’s like, ‘Whoa, slow down!’ You know the drill – heavy breathing, pounding heart, the works. Your body’s smart, it knows when to say ‘enough is enough.’ You will gasp, you will fumble, you will just not be able to move on, but before that stage, you will considerably slow down, automagically – thats how the body works.

But now, let’s switch gears to the treadmill. You’re pounding away, and that trusty machine just keeps on chugging. And here’s the kicker – your body’s still sending those ‘slow down’ signals, but the treadmill’s like, ‘Nah, we’re not stopping yet.’

So what happens? You end up pushing yourself harder than you should, all because that treadmill’s got your back – or rather, your legs. It’s like your body’s saying ‘stop,’ but the treadmill’s saying ‘go, go, go!’ And that’s where things can get messy. Your body’s hitting its limits, but the treadmill’s oblivious. The natural slowing down, the defense mechanism of the body I would assume, is bypassed – thanks to that machine at work.

So next time you’re on that treadmill, keep in mind – listen to your body, not just the machine. It knows when to call it quits, even if the treadmill doesn’t. Do not push yourself too hard.

I can go about harping on how awesome the outdoor is anyhow, but that is not the point of this post. Outdoor is the way of expressing it, If not running – you can do walking and jogging indoors as well, without really needing a treadmill.